Auston Woods Apartment Homes

5301 Roundstone Way, Charlotte, NC 28216
Call: 833-392-5643 (704) 597-7192 Email UsAustonWoods.PropertySite.HHHunt@aptleasing.info View Map

Opens: Monday-Friday: 9A-6P | Saturday: 10A-5P | Sunday: 1P-5P

$883-$1,200

Apartments Charlotte NC Blog

It is Cheaper to Rent than Own in Every State, Including Yours - Charlotte, NC

Joseph Coupal - Wednesday, March 29, 2017

Auston Woods, Charlotte, NCOwning a home is often considered the American dream — and it’s an expensive one. Homeowners in all 50 states and Washington, D.C., pay from 33% to 93% more for housing each month than do renters living in the same state, according to a new NerdWallet analysis.

But many homeowners reap benefits that you can’t get from renting. The equity you build can be leveraged for loans that can be used to improve the home and boost its value or be used in financial emergencies.

While renting can’t offer thosefinancial benefits, it’s cheaper to rent on a month-to-month basis. If you’re wondering how to save money for a down payment, renting can help you build that nest egg — but in extremely expensive or competitive markets, renting might be better for the long haul.

To determine the monthly homeownership premium — the additional cost of owning instead of renting, expressed as a percentage — NerdWallet compared 2015 American Community Survey data from the U.S. Census Bureau for the median gross rent and median homeownership cost in each state and Washington, D.C. Median gross rent includes the costs of monthly rent and utilities for all kinds of rental properties, and median homeownership cost includes monthly mortgage payments, real estate taxes, insurance and utilities. This comparison doesn’t include the down payment required to buy a home, which is traditionally 20% of the home price for conventional mortgages, but is lower for FHA or VA loans.

Key takeaways

  • Owning is more expensive everywhere. Across all 50 states and Washington, D.C., it costs more each month to own a home than to rent. The median cost people pay nationwide to own a home is 54% more than the median cost to rent each month.
  • The smallest difference is still a third more to own.
  • In some states, the cost of owning far eclipses renting.

State: North Carolina
Homeownership Premium: 49%
Median Monthly Cost to Own: $1234
Median Monthly Cost to Rent: $827
Difference: $407

For more information on apartments in Charlotte, NC, contact Auston Woods.

#HowYouLive
NerdWallet


In Charlotte, NC You Can Live Like Royalty for Less Than 70K

Joseph Coupal - Tuesday, March 21, 2017

Auston Woods, Charlotte, NCMaking a good living is one thing, living well is another. And that often boils down to where you choose to live.

The best places are likely the ones where you can find a job, earn a good salary and buy a nice home. In a 2016 report, job-hunting site Glassdoor calculated the top spots where your pay will go furthest, based on salaries and home values. To do so, the jobs site came up with a cost of living ratio — a city's median base salary divided by its median home value.

Noticeably missing are some of America's biggest cities. While you can certainly earn more in hubs like New York and San Francisco, few people can afford to buy a house or an apartment there.

We came up with the top 25 cities where an average paycheck goes a very long way and the quality of life is great. (A higher ratio number is better.)

17. Charlotte, NC

Cost of living ratio: 36%
Median base salary: $58,000
Number of open jobs: 37,180

For more information on apartments in Charlotte, NC, contact Auston Woods.

#HowYouLive
CNBC


Best Places to Live in America – Charlotte, North Carolina

Joseph Coupal - Wednesday, March 15, 2017

Auston Woods, Charlotte, NCWhen deciding where to put down roots, many factors are in the eye of the beholder, such as climate, politics, or proximity to extended family.

Other aspects are coveted by nearly everybody: affordable housing, access to well-paying jobs, a low cost of living, good schools, and quality healthcare. In its recently released ranking of the best places to live in America, U.S. News & World Report gathered data on these crucial components for the 100 most populous US cities.

They then categorized the data into five indexes for each city — job market, value, quality of life, desirability, and net migration — to definitively rank these major metro areas.

Scores for "value," a blend of annual household income and cost of living, and "quality of life," which accounts for crime, college readiness, commute, and other factors, are included below on a 10-point scale, as well as the city’s population and median annual salary.

15. Charlotte, North Carolina

Population: 2,298,915
Median annual salary: $48,290
Quality of life: 6.5
Overall value: 7.5

A “melting pot effect” draws all types of people to Charlotte, a place with “equal parts old-fashioned southern charm and high-energy cosmopolitan bustle,” touted one local expert. NASCAR and motorsports are a cultural cornerstone of Charlotte. The Queen City houses Bank of America’s headquarters and major offices for Wells Fargo, making it one of the largest financial hubs in the country.

For more information on apartments in Charlotte, NC contact Auston Woods.

#HowYouLive
businessinsider.com


North Carolina is One of America's Top States for Business 2016

Joseph Coupal - Wednesday, March 08, 2017

Auston Woods, Charlotte, NCWe score all 50 states on more than 60 measures of competitiveness, developed with input from a broad and diverse array of business and policy experts, official government sources, the CNBC Global CFO Council and the states themselves. States receive points based on their rankings in each metric. Then we separate those metrics into 10 broad categories, weighted based on how frequently each is used as a selling point in state economic development marketing materials. That way, our study ranks the states based on the criteria they use to sell themselves.

Our study is not an opinion survey. We rely on tangible numbers to gauge each state's performance, scoring all 50 states on more than 60 measures of competitiveness, using publicly available data.

Here are our categories and this year's weightings.

Workforce - We rate states based on the education level of their workforce, the numbers of available employees, and the states' demonstrated abilities to retain college-educated workers. We measure workforce productivity based on each state's economic output per job. We look at the relative success of each state's worker training programs in placing their participants in jobs. We also consider union membership and the states' right-to-work laws.

Cost of Doing Business - We look at the competitiveness of each state's tax climate, as well as state-sponsored incentives that can lower the cost of doing business. Utility costs can add up to a huge expense for business, and they vary widely by state. We also consider the cost of wages, as well as rental costs for office and industrial space.

Infrastructure - We measure the vitality of each state's transportation system by the value of goods shipped by air, waterways, roads and rail. We look at the availability of air travel in each state, the quality of the roads and bridges, and the time it takes to commute to work.

Economy - We look at economic growth, job creation, consumer spending, and the health of the residential real estate market. We measure each state's fiscal health by looking at its credit ratings and outlook, as well as its overall budget picture. We also consider the number of major corporations headquartered in each state.

Quality of Life - We score the states on livability, including several factors, such as the crime rate; inclusiveness, such as antidiscrimination protections; the quality of health care; the level of health insurance coverage and the overall health of the population. We evaluate local attractions, parks and recreation, as well as environmental quality.

Technology & Innovation - We evaluate the states on their support for innovation, the number of patents issued to their residents and the record of high-tech business formation. We also consider federal health, science and agricultural research grants to the states.

Education - Higher-education institutions offer companies a source to recruit new talent, as well as a partner in research and development. We consider the number of higher-education institutions in each state, as well as long-term funding trends for higher education. We look at several measures of K–12 education, including test scores, class size and spending. We also look digital and lifelong learning opportunities in each state.

Business Friendliness - But we grade the states on the freedom their legal and regulatory frameworks provide for business.

Cost of Living- The cost of living helps drive the cost of doing business. From housing to food and energy, wages go further when the cost of living is low.

Access to Capital - We look at venture capital investments by state, as well as small-business lending on a relative basis.

North Carolina is #5 on the list of America's Top States for Business.

For more information on apartments in Charlotte, NC contact Auston Woods.

#HowYouLive
cnbc.com


Should I Rent or Buy? Question to Ask – Charlotte, NC

Joseph Coupal - Wednesday, March 01, 2017

Auston Woods, Charlotte, NC“Should I buy a house?” This life-changing question is not something you casually ask the magic eight ball and get hit with a vague answer like, “Concentrate and ask again.” Instead, there is an empirical way to find out if you should buy a house or rent an apartment in Charlotte, NC. Ask yourself these questions below.

Question No. 1: Can I afford a home?

The first step is to find out whether you can buy a house given your current financial situation. A calculator will help you figure out just how much house you can afford. However, a rule of thumb is that you should spend no more than 33% of your income on housing.

Question No. 2: Is it better for me to rent or buy?

The whole “rent or buy?” question depends on which housing market you’re in, because inventory can make a huge difference.

Question No. 3: How long can I stay put?

Generally the longer you live in a home, the smarter it is to buy rather than rent. Short-term stays? Renting might make more sense. The reason: When you buy a home, you’ll pay closing costs that can total thousands of dollars, plus most of your early mortgage payments go toward interest rather than whittling down the principal (the actual amount you owe on your home). As a result, as a rule of thumb, home buyers should plan to stay put at least five years. If you might move before that point, you should stick with renting instead.

Question No. 4: Are my retirement savings on track?

We know, retirement seems a long way off. Still, it’s crucial to start storing those nuts early. So if you’re neglecting your 401(k) to funnel all your funds toward a home purchase that may not be the best allocation of resources (particularly if your employer matches funds, which is free money). Another reason: Setting aside money in a retirement account must be done the year you earn that income; you can’t go back later with a wad of cash and hope to squeeze it in.

When in doubt on what to do, consult a financial adviser who can help you strike a balance between saving for a house and your future simultaneously.

Question No. 5: Am I ready for the responsibility?

With rentals, you can just call your landlord to fix that leaky faucet. With a home you own, it’s all on you. So ask yourself if you’re willing to forgo weekend bar crawls with friends in lieu of mowing the lawn or patching the roof.

Ask yourself the following: “Do I have the time, resources, and desire to take on home maintenance and repairs as well as yard maintenance?”

For more information on apartments in Charlotte, NC contact Auston Woods.

#HowYouLive
realtor.com



Auston Woods Apartment Homes

5301 Roundstone Way, Charlotte, NC 28216

Call: 833-392-5643
Email UsAustonWoods.PropertySite.HHHunt@aptleasing.info
View Map

Opens: Monday-Friday: 9A-6P | Saturday: 10A-5P | Sunday: 1P-5P

$883-$1,200