Auston Woods Apartment Homes

5301 Roundstone Way, Charlotte, NC 28216
Call: 833-392-5643 (704) 597-7192 Email UsAustonWoods.PropertySite.HHHunt@aptleasing.info View Map

Opens: Monday-Friday: 9A-6P | Saturday: 10A-5P | Sunday: 1P-5P

$883-$1,200

Apartments Charlotte NC Blog

What Millennials are Looking for in Apartments in Charlotte, NC

Joseph Coupal - Tuesday, November 22, 2016

A good number of apartment communities are finding out what amenities and services appeal to the millennial population.

To satisfy both cost and quality of life requirements, most millennials have moved (or desire to move) into modernized apartment communities.

It turns out that there are several key factors surrounding this move including: communities close to campus, ample storage space, a fitness center, and individualized bathrooms and/or bedrooms. This is more so the case with females at 69% than males at 31%.

What it boils down to overall is that millennials are looking for luxury amenities that they can’t get on campus at a reasonable price they can afford. Property managers are helping to make this possible.

Today’s students prefer off-campus student housing to dorm life for a variety of reasons, such as cost, freedom and more space, but they appear to be most interested in the social opportunities these properties enable and encourage and the opportunity to be on their own for the first time.

Here are a few things that are important to millennials when it comes to housing.

Internet, WiFi, and Cable Access

In an increasingly technological era, millennials don’t like to be without connection. It’s one of the worst feelings ever. They place a high value on having access to high-speed internet, WiFi and cable in their apartments.

Closet Space

By definition, an apartment has more space than a dorm room and less space than a full house. Many millennials have not accumulated a lot of furniture at this stage in their lives, but they still want more than enough room to keep their clothes and other belongings. Space also includes having big storage areas as well as full bathrooms and large kitchens.

Kitchen Space

As more millennials aim to keep their lifestyle high but their costs low, dine-in is becoming so old school and cooking at home is the latest trend. Wide open, modern kitchens can be a major deal breaker for the 61 percent of millennials who now cook their own food. A reasonably sized kitchen can also be helpful when there are two or three people living in the apartment.

Cost Effectiveness

With the cost of tuition skyrocketing, students could avoid the added headache of monthly rent. Many millennials are willing to pay a pretty penny for a decent place that includes amenities they care about.

Safety of Property

Seventy six percent of millennials report that safety is their number one priority when scouting out a new place.

Pet Friendliness

Seventy-six percent of millennials love their pets. Even if everything else is great about the apartment, they could still not choose to live there for the simple reason that their pet can stay with them. Property managers should consider this and have outside and inside space available for pets.

Outside Space

Millennials tend to place a pretty high value upon outdoor spaces for studying, chatting, or just hanging out alone or with friends. Take a little time to consider the outdoor settings with additions such as outdoor furniture and lighting to foster a sense of connection and community. If they are not living with friends, students can choose to get to know their neighbors by spending time outside, holding grilling sessions, swimming meets, or anything else deemed enjoyable. Since apartments lack the front yard/backyard atmosphere that a house has, students will find this an easy way to relax and enjoy the weather.

For more information on apartments in Charlotte, NC contact Auston Woods.

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11 Signs You're Not Ready to Buy a House – Charlotte, NC

Joseph Coupal - Wednesday, November 16, 2016

Making the leap from renting to buying is thrilling and liberating. But it's also a big decision, both for your future and your finances.It's a long-term commitment that requires strong financial standing, and in many ways it's about more than just money.

If any of the following signs strike a chord with you, you may want to delay the home-buying process.

You have a low credit score

Before considering home ownership, you'll want to check your credit score.

The higher your score, the better the interest rate on your mortgage will be. Good credit can mean significantly lower monthly payments, so if your score is not great, consider delaying this big purchase until you've built up your credit.

You're doing it as an investment

If someone asks why you want to buy a house and your first answer is something along the lines of "Because I'm wasting money on rent" or "Because it's a good investment," you might not be mentally prepared for all the responsibilities that come with home ownership.

When you look at the average price increase of a home across the country over the last 100 years, it's only about 3%. If you take away extra costs plus inflation, you're not really making any money on average on a single-family home.

It's smarter to look for a house that meets non-monetary goals: It's in your dream neighborhood or it's a good place to start a family. A home is a utility, not an investment.

You have to direct more than 30% of your income toward monthly payments

Personal finance experts say a good rule of thumb is to make sure the total monthly payment doesn't consume more than 30% of your take-home pay.

Any more than that, and your finances are going to be tight, leaving you financially vulnerable when something inevitably goes wrong.

While there are a few exceptions, aim to spend no more than one-third of your take-home pay on housing.

You don't have a fully funded emergency savings account

And no, your emergency fund is not your down payment.

We all receive unexpected financial setbacks. Someone gets sick. The insurance company denies a medical claim. A job is suddenly lost. However life intrudes, the bank still expects to receive our monthly mortgage payments ... Finance your emergency fund. Then think about purchasing a home. If you don't have an emergency fund and do own a house, chances are good you will someday find yourself in financial turmoil.

Have the equivalent of a few years' worth of living expenses set aside in case there is a job loss or other surprise.

Unlike a rental arrangement with a one- or two-year contract and known termination clauses, defaulting on a mortgage can do major damage to your credit report. In addition, a quick sale is not always possible or equitable for a seller.

You aren't putting anything into savings

Even with a full emergency fund, you should still be able to continue putting money away for other goals.

If you're saving money every month, that means your cash flow is in good shape, which is a good sign you're ready to buy a home.

If you can't spare anything more than the mortgage payment, consider putting off purchasing a home until your cash flow is more stable.

You can't afford a 10% down payment

Technically, you don't always have to put any money down when financing a home today, but if you can't afford to put at least 10% down, you may want to reconsider buying.

Ideally, you'll be able to put 20% down — anything lower and you will have to pay for private mortgage insurance (PMI), which is a safety net for the bank in case you fail to make your payments. PMI can cost between 0.5% and 1.50% of mortgage, depending on the size of your down payment and your credit score — that's an additional $1,000 a year on a $200,000 home.

The more money you can put down toward the initial purchase of a home, the lower your monthly mortgage payment. That's because you will need to borrow less money to finance the home. This can save you tens of thousands of dollars over the life of the loan.

To get an idea of the savings you'll have to put away, check out how much you need to save each day to put a down payment on a house in major US cities.

You're planning other big expenses in the next few years

It's important to consider your housing budget within the context of your future goals. Keep in mind the next couple of years down the road and what you have coming up.

You plan on moving within the next five years

Home ownership, like stock investing, works best as a long-term proposition. It takes at least five years to have a reasonable chance of breaking even on a housing purchase. For the first few years, your mortgage payments mostly pay off the interest and not the principal. It is recommended to stay put for at least 10 years.

The longer you stay in your house, the more you save. If you sell through a traditional realtor, you pay that person a huge fee — usually 6% of the selling price. Divide that by just a few years, and it hits you a lot harder than if you had held the house for ten or twenty years.

Not to mention, moving costs can be exorbitant on their own.

You won't be able to keep up with other goals

Don't feel like you need to have every penny worth of debt paid off before you can purchase a home. But do a deep dive into why you have debt and how you're planning to deal with it, from student loans to credit card charges.

Why do you have the credit card debt? Was it just a random occurrence where you had to put something on the credit card and you know you're going to pay it off soon? Or have you been spending more than you make and it's increasing over time?

It's okay to still be paying off your student loans or paying down past credit card debt. But if the added costs that come with buying a house — mortgage payments, taxes, and repairs — impede your ability to continue putting money toward those goals each month, you might want to hold off for now and let your other expenses take priority.

You're deep in debt

While it's okay to have some debt, if it's a significant enough amount, it could hinder your ability to buy a house at all. If your debt is high, home ownership is going to be a stretch.

When you apply for a mortgage, you'll be asked about everything you owe — from car and student loans to credit card debt.

If the combination of that debt with the amount you want to borrow exceeds 43% of your income, you will have a hard time getting a mortgage. Your 'debt-to-income ratio' will be deemed too high, and mortgage issuers will consider you at high risk for a future default.

You've only considered the sticker price

You have to look at much more than just the sticker price of the home. There are a mountain of hidden costs — from closing fees to taxes — that can add up to more than $9,000 each year, real estate marketplace. And that number will only jump if you live in a major US city.

You'll have to consider things such as property tax, insurance, utilities, moving costs, renovations, and perhaps the most overlooked expense: maintenance.

The actual purchase price is not the most important cost. What's important is how much it's going to cost to maintain that house.

For more information on apartments in Charlotte, NC contact Auston Woods.

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Even Those with High Incomes Prefer to Rent – Charlotte, NC

Joseph Coupal - Thursday, November 10, 2016

“Rent, don’t buy,” may be the new mantra among higher-income Americans. A study of U.S. Census Bureau data discovered much greater growth in renting versus buying among wealthy people.

Here’s a key set of numbers from the study: “From 2005 to 2015, the number of renter households who earn more than $150,000/year increased by 217 percent,” while there was only an 82 percent increase in the number of homeowner households within the same income bracket.

After the real estate crash in 2007 and 2008, many people switched from owning their own homes to renting, whether that was their plan or not. You might think richer people would see the opportunity and snap up properties at bargain prices that less well-off people either couldn’t afford or couldn’t qualify for. However, that doesn’t appear to be the case, based on the analysis of the census data. “We also noticed that every single year since 2009, the largest increase in U.S. renter households came from high-income earners,” the study concludes.

The numbers mentioned so far have been based on percentage increases, which can be misleading because total numbers may look different. But even absolute numbers show the same trend of high-income renters, especially in cities where renter increase rates are much higher than average.

Cities where rich renter numbers are growing the fastest include Memphis, Tennessee; Phoenix, Chicago, and Detroit, as well as Charlotte, North Carolina; Portland, Oregon; San Jose, California; Austin, Texas; and Fort Worth, Texas. New York City wasn’t among the top 10 states showing rich renter growth, but nonetheless has the largest absolute number of wealthy renters.

Nationwide, there are seven times more homeowners than renters in the upper-income bracket. Overall, renters account for more than a third of U.S. households, with most earning less than $50,000 annually. What the study found was signs of a shift among higher-income households in favor of renting urban luxury apartments rather than a house in the suburbs.

For more information on renting apartments in Charlotte, NC contact Auston Woods.

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Living in Charlotte, NC this Season

Joseph Coupal - Wednesday, November 02, 2016

If you live in an apartment in Charlotte, NC here are some of the area holiday events you can start to enjoy this season!

Southern Christmas Show, The Park Expo and Conference Center
Find inspiration for decking your halls at the Southern Christmas Show Nov. 10-20. Christmas Tree Lane includes dozens of fresh Fraser firs decorated by designers in all different styles. Gifts and decorations fill the village shops inside Olde Towne at the show. Miniature trains, holiday choirs and Santa bring merriment to attendees of all ages.

Holidays at the Garden, Daniel Stowe Botanical Garden
Belmont’s Daniel Stowe Botanical Garden becomes a winter wonderland with Holidays at the Garden Nov. 18-Jan. 1. More than 600,000 lights illuminate the garden. One of the most popular features is the stunning orchid tree. Activities include marshmallow roasts, visits with Santa and holiday shopping in The Garden Store.

Speedway Christmas, Charlotte Motor Speedway
Speedway Christmas revs up the Christmas cheer Nov. 19-Dec. 31 with 3.7 miles of drive-through displays, including a portion on the 1.5-mile superspeedway. Classic holiday movies play on the 16,000-square-foot high-definition TV Thursday through Sundays. And the Egg Nog Jog kicks things off on Nov. 19 with a 5K run through the light show.

Charlotte Christmas Village, Romare Bearden Park
From Thanksgiving Day, Nov. 24, to Christmas Eve, Romare Bearden Park in Uptown becomes the Charlotte Christmas Village. Inspired by the German tradition of Christmas markets, vendors will sell handmade crafts, gifts and specialty foods from wooden huts. Strudels, bratwurst, German beer and mulled wine will flow freely.

One Hundred Years of Christmas, Historic Latta Plantation
Learn how the holidays evolved from Colonial days to the antebellum period at Latta Plantation’s living history event Nov. 25-26. Located in Huntersville, about 30 minutes north of Charlotte, the site is a circa 18th-century cotton plantation. Re-enactors will demonstrate period preparations for the Christmas holiday.

Holidays at the Hall, NASCAR Hall of Fame
Celebrate the holidays with the NASCAR Hall of Fame. The Hall Plaza will be themed with reindeer, elves and a giant polar bear. Don’t miss the 39-foot-tall tree of twinkling lights! Other festivities include Breakfast with Santa Dec. 3 and Dec. 17, UnDeck the Hall Dec. 26, and much more.

Christmas in Davidson, Davidson
For three nights, Dec. 1-3, downtown Davidson lights up with fun for the entire family. The adults shop for gifts at Main Street businesses and inside the Holiday Village. Kids enjoy arts and crafts as well as visits from Santa and Mrs. Claus. Other attractions include live entertainment, holiday treats and horse-drawn carriage rides.

Christmas Town USA, McAdenville
Each December, McAdenville, about 15 miles west of Charlotte, becomes Christmas Town USA. The tradition of homeowners decorating their houses and yards with lights dates back to the mid-1950s. Visitors can explore the 1.3-mile route via car or foot. The lights go on Dec. 1 and burn every night until Dec. 26.

Fourth Ward Holiday Home Tour, Uptown
For nearly 40 years, residents of historic Fourth Ward have opened their homes to visitors for this self-guided tour, which runs this season Dec. 2-4. The neighborhood’s signature Victorian homes are decked out in holiday finery. Horse-drawn carriages transport tour goers, and food, wine and beer samples from nearby Uptown restaurants are offered along the way.

Weihnachtsmarkt, The Olde Mecklenburg Brewery
Sip craft beer, shop local products and indulge in freshly baked goods at The Olde Mecklenburg Brewery’s annual Weihnachtsmarkt. The event honors the German tradition of a Christmas market, where vendors sell goods from open-air booths. This year’s event runs in the Biergarten on Fridays and Saturdays for three consecutive weekends—Dec. 2-3, 9-10 and 16-17.

Gingerbread Lane, The Ballantyne Hotel & Lodge
Vote for your favorite houses among the competition that lines Gingerbread Lane at The Ballantyne. The hotel holds a gingerbread house contest for professionals, amateurs and youth, and the houses are on display Dec. 8-28. Other hotel celebrations include decorating gingerbread houses and enjoying holiday afternoon tea.

Downtown Christmas Village, Belmont
Belmont, located about 30 minutes from Uptown Charlotte, celebrates the Christmas season on Dec. 9, when the picturesque downtown becomes an incredible Christmas village. Explore the Main Street shops, take a ride on a horse-drawn carriage, listen to Christmas carols, visit with Santa, and enjoy hot chocolate and s’mores.

The 62nd Annual Singing Christmas Tree, Knight Theater
Following a tradition that has spanned six decades, Carolina Voices once again presents this Charlotte favorite. Join in on the lyrics Dec.10-11 as the MainStage Choir sings your favorite Christmas jingles. The show incorporates dance, puppetry and a 32-foot-tall “singing” tree comprised of talented members. A version for children ages 3 to 10 takes place at an earlier time each day.

Community Hanukkah Celebration, Temple Israel
Sponsored by the Temple Israel Men’s Club, Temple Israel invites family and friends to join in a special celebration of the lighting of the season’s first Hanukkah candle on Dec. 24. Bring your family menorah and candles and enjoy a Chinese-inspired dinner, a DJ, dancing and dessert.

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Charlotte's Got Alot



Auston Woods Apartment Homes

5301 Roundstone Way, Charlotte, NC 28216

Call: 833-392-5643
Email UsAustonWoods.PropertySite.HHHunt@aptleasing.info
View Map

Opens: Monday-Friday: 9A-6P | Saturday: 10A-5P | Sunday: 1P-5P

$883-$1,200